3 Ways to GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR DREAMS

3 Ways to GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR DREAMS

You’re doing it wrong—dreaming. 

JK. Sort of. Let us explain. 

It’s not that we’re dreaming wrong. It’s that we could be dreaming better. 

Dreams are super important for things like emotional processing and cognitive and problem-solving skills, as we previously learned from Jean-Baptiste Beau, founder and CEO of the dream app Oniri. Now, he’s back to teach us about different types of dreams and how to get even more out of them.

Types of Dreams

“Dreams are usually categorized as dreams and nightmares. This binary classification is arbitrary, as there is a wide spectrum of emotions we can experience during dreams,” Jean-Baptiste says. 

It’s common to think that dreams = good and nightmares = bad. But not so fast. 

“While nightmares are usually disliked and avoided, both types are useful,” Jean-Baptiste says. “Nightmares can play a key role in processing difficult events or regulating emotions like stress and anxiety.” However, he notes that they do become a problem if you’re having nightmares too frequently—at least one per week—because they may be linked to a disorder like PTSD. 

Now for the really juicy stuff. 

“There is one special type of dream that is very different from the rest that deserves its own category—lucid dreams,” Jean-Baptiste says. “Lucid dreams are dreams in which we realize we are dreaming and can control the content of the dream.” Trippy. 

“This type of dream usually only occurs a few times in our life, although some people have it every night,” he says. The cool thing, though, is that it is a skill that can be practiced with the help of techniques and tools, like Jean-Baptiste’s dream app. 

Get the most out of your dreams. 

1. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A WRONG DREAM.

“First, accept that there is no ‘wrong’ dream,” Jean-Baptiste says. “Every dream is there. Some are more enjoyable than others, and some are more useful.”

2. KEEP A DREAM JOURNAL.

Remembering your dreams is the best way to get the most out of them. “This will help you understand yourself better, regulate your emotions better, and be more confident in yourself and in your life,” Jean-Baptiste explains.

One of the best ways to do this is by keeping a dream journal. “Try to remember your dreams every morning when you wake up, and your dream recall will improve drastically. Once you recall your dreams better, you can start analyzing your dreams, and/or practice lucid dreaming,” he says.

“If you suffer from frequent nightmares, dream journaling and dream analysis can help reduce them,” he adds. “If that alone is not enough, we recommend consulting a psychologist, as this may be linked to a difficult memory or an anxiety disorder.”

3. GET ENOUGH QUALITY SLEEP.

“There is a strong link between the quality of our sleep and the quality of our dreams,” Jean-Baptiste says.

“Good sleep hygiene is the first thing to monitor,” he says. This means:

  • Remove light and sound distractions from the bedroom.
    Lower the temperature.
  • Avoid screens, heavy meals, and exercise before going to sleep.

“It is also important to get the recommended amount of sleep, which is seven to eight hours,” he advises.

Lucid dreaming comes with its own set of benefits. “Lucid dreaming is hard to master and requires patience, but the benefits are definitely worth it,” Jean-Baptiste says. “Because you can control what’s happening in your dream, you can use your dreams to:

  • Turn nightmares into pleasant dreams.
    Relax and unwind.
  • Face difficult situations and process them (like talking with a lost relative or an ex).
  • Practice skills (like an instrument) or situations (like a speech).
    Develop your creativity.

BRB—we know what our next hyperfixation is going to be.

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